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abc says type 2 cured
2 years ago  ::  Jun 20, 2012 - 6:27AM #22
cmkeyse
Posts: 3,349

Apr 5, 2012 -- 10:26PM, janisroszler wrote:


Apr 4, 2012 -- 2:28PM, Talvie Lightsinger wrote:


But let's not tell every diabetic that they would benefit from losing weight...depends on the diabetic and whether or not they need to lose weight.  I did, but I have friends who were diagnosed at a healthy weight to begin with....what do we tell those folks? 




People who are at their ideal weight or are underweight obviously don't need to lose additional weight.  Those who are at a healthy weight to begin with should be encouraged to maintain their weight, participate in regular physical activity, reduce their stress, and eat a meal plan that enables them to maintain their blood glucose level within a healthy range.  



Janis




Janis,


The advice I would give a person at their ideal weight or less, particularly if they are a senior, is to request that their doctor give them C-peptide test and a circulating insulin (Insulin) test to determine is they need insulin rather than treating insulin resistance. If insulin is needed, then just like a type-1 insulin is the only really effective treatment.


Since weight does not measure either fitness or insulin resistance (increase weight raises the odds of insulin resistance but can be misleading), one can be thin and have high insulin resistance. Since one's genes determine the number of fat cells they determine a healthy weight. As fat cells become full they release hormones Leptin and Resistin that among other things cause insulin resistance which leads to type-2 diabetes. The bottom line is that a thin person can have insulin resistance and a fat person may not have insulin resistance.


If one has insulin resistance, the treatment is to reduce body fat, which is the advice you gave. A thin person that is out of shape can be less healthy than a overweight person that has lots of muscle and bone mass. In any case converting stored fat to muscle is probably the best advice to give a thin person with insulin resistance.


Just my thoughts.


Chuck


2 years ago  ::  Jun 18, 2012 - 11:09PM #21
Becky
Posts: 12

Furball, I am glad that you pointed out that you had to cut back on the carbs that you were advised to eat by the diabetic "professionals."  I have talked with dieticians and they have told me "Oh, you can have white bread! We recommend yogurt (or other carb snack) as a snack!"  B.S. I already know that you can't recommend carbs for type 2 people. If I do not eat between meals I have better control of my numbers. Even nuts or string cheese sends my numbers up.  (String cheese?! I mean, come on!) 


So basically, I am on my own as far as figuring out what to eat. I read the books, I've been searching the web for some type of low-carb diabetic meal plan, and the only thing I have run across are a couple of sites that actually promote an Atkins-style diet. I am pretty hooked on carbs and had tried the Atkins diet pre-diabetes and couldn't get past the induction phase, it was just too drastic of a change to go no-carb.


I keep tryin' though!


 

2 years ago  ::  Apr 08, 2012 - 7:21PM #20
furball64801
Posts: 6,943

Correct eat right and exercise but again this does not  cover  if your not overweight the public thinks just get this surgery and poof your not diabetic.     I have heard and seen it all over the internet,    it needs to be clarified  this is not a cure  and people have to change all the things they do and its not like they can eat cake and ice cream daily like a non diabetic ever. 

2 years ago  ::  Apr 05, 2012 - 10:26PM #19
janisroszler
Posts: 7,107

Apr 4, 2012 -- 2:28PM, Talvie Lightsinger wrote:


But let's not tell every diabetic that they would benefit from losing weight...depends on the diabetic and whether or not they need to lose weight.  I did, but I have friends who were diagnosed at a healthy weight to begin with....what do we tell those folks? 




People who are at their ideal weight or are underweight obviously don't need to lose additional weight.  Those who are at a healthy weight to begin with should be encouraged to maintain their weight, participate in regular physical activity, reduce their stress, and eat a meal plan that enables them to maintain their blood glucose level within a healthy range.  



Janis

Janis Roszler, MSFT, RD, CDE, LD/N
Moderator
Follow me on twitter:  @dearjanis
2 years ago  ::  Apr 05, 2012 - 3:37PM #18
Vpenning
Posts: 8,840

Talvie- You are so correct. According to studies up to 15% of Type 2 diabetics are NOT overweight...so, it does point out that weight must not be the only factor involved. If you figure that 26 MILLION Americans alone have Type 2 diabetes. That means that close to 4 MILLION Americans are NOT overweight and have Type 2 diabetes. That is a LOT of folks walking around with diabetes that would NOT be "cured" by surgery.


In addition, as I mentioned above, those that ARE overweight and have the surgery...not all have improvement. Some actually have NO improvement.


Unless it is 100%, a treatment cannot be called a cure...it can only be called a course of action...or a treatment. It can help some, but it is not the answer for all.


And, of course, as I mentioned before, I lost a whole lot of weight-I am in normal BMI, and I have gotten my numbers under control...but, if you give me a regular coke, or some pecan pie...you are going to see numbers over 200...and, that is NOT cured!!!

2 years ago  ::  Apr 04, 2012 - 2:28PM #17
Talvie Lightsinger
Posts: 799
type2

Mar 31, 2012 -- 9:00PM, janisroszler wrote:


Bypass surgery may cure type 2 diabetes in some people, but it is still a very difficult procedure and can cause a variety of serious complications, including death.  It is a good option for some people, but is not for everyone.  Weight loss isn't easy, but you don't have to lose much to improve your diabetes control.  As little as 10% can really make a difference.  Take it one pound at a time and you can get there!


Janis





Again, this assumes that diabetics need to lose weight.  Losing weight does have benefits for some, but as a panacea for diabetes, it's not all it's cracked up to be.  I lost 60 pounds over a year's time, and have kept it off for 10 years, and my regimen now is exactly the same as when I started my journey.  Same medication (more of it actually), same way of eating, and the same need for exercise.   I'm not saying that I didn't benefit, because I did:  I look and feel better.


But let's not tell every diabetic that they would benefit from losing weight...depends on the diabetic and whether or not they need to lose weight.  I did, but I have friends who were diagnosed at a healthy weight to begin with....what do we tell those folks? 

Talvie
2 years ago  ::  Apr 02, 2012 - 9:21PM #16
furball64801
Posts: 6,943

What these stories do is make non diabetic  think if you lose  5% or 10% of your weight you will no longer need meds or be diabetic.     In ths short time this story has been out I have heard it from numerous family members and  just those on the street.     Sure weight loss can help some but again my mother and aunts were under 100 lbs   and were still type 2   so one size does not fit all.

2 years ago  ::  Apr 02, 2012 - 9:15PM #15
furball64801
Posts: 6,943

Apr 2, 2012 -- 8:17PM, janisroszler wrote:


Mar 31, 2012 -- 9:35PM, furball64801 wrote:


Just for those that  think losing weight can make a difference my answer would be maybe.    I lost 80 lbs and my bs was still in the 200 to 300 range.     My mom and aunts were under 100 lbs and type 2  so its YMMV    type 2 is a disease or whatever it is that has multiple levels.    So I lost way more than 10% and it did nothing for my readings. 





Hi Furball,


Your individual home glucose tests may not have changed, but your diabetes control definitely improved.  Diabetes control is more than blood sugar numbers.  It is blood pressure and circulation, blood fat levels (cholesterol/triglycerides), nerve conduction, A1C, etc. Did you experience ANY change in your health?  80 pounds is a lot of weight to lose.


Janis



Janis things improved because I cut the carbs I  was being told to eat daily.     Some people might be able to   eat all those carbs but many type 2s can not.    It also helped to have my meter tell me what was going on.    I lost most of the weight because of out of control bs readings,     I still need insulin and I still need a big reduction in carbs to have my readings now.    Its been 28 yrs  and for the first about 15 were a disaster   I hope others can get control right away.

2 years ago  ::  Apr 02, 2012 - 8:17PM #14
janisroszler
Posts: 7,107

Mar 31, 2012 -- 9:35PM, furball64801 wrote:


Just for those that  think losing weight can make a difference my answer would be maybe.    I lost 80 lbs and my bs was still in the 200 to 300 range.     My mom and aunts were under 100 lbs and type 2  so its YMMV    type 2 is a disease or whatever it is that has multiple levels.    So I lost way more than 10% and it did nothing for my readings. 





Hi Furball,


Your individual home glucose tests may not have changed, but your diabetes control definitely improved.  Diabetes control is more than blood sugar numbers.  It is blood pressure and circulation, blood fat levels (cholesterol/triglycerides), nerve conduction, A1C, etc. Did you experience ANY change in your health?  80 pounds is a lot of weight to lose.


Janis

Janis Roszler, MSFT, RD, CDE, LD/N
Moderator
Follow me on twitter:  @dearjanis
2 years ago  ::  Apr 02, 2012 - 5:09PM #13
furball64801
Posts: 6,943

Mar 31, 2012 -- 10:42PM, copperhairpin wrote:


Thank you for sharing Furball.  I needed to hear what you shared.  Come to think about it it is easy to forget that diabetes is a progressive disease also.  Some can slow it down and stall it but for just about everybody it is.  So that makes a difference also.  I am large now but my control is pretty good.  Guess I fortunate in that way.  My companion has had diabetes for over 35 years and sometimes we will eat the same things and his reading can be 100 to 150 higher than mine.


It really is a multiple level complexity.


Sally



This is what many doctors and the medical profession miss.      It must be the patients fault if there  bs is not in control,   forget there doing all the things they were told to do.       I must say this is the biggest thing that hacks me off,     how about get the right treatment and maybe the patient will not be at fault. 

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