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Depressed from seizure....
1 year ago  ::  Aug 15, 2013 - 7:14PM #5
wasd13
Posts: 3
Yeep26 I can relate to your seizure I am 20 years old and I have had t1 since I was 11 months old and till this day if I ever have low blood sugar in the middle of the night I wake up screaming and having uncontrollable convulsions and until a couple of years ago I wouldn't remember any of it so I slept just fine well now days I remember every moment and it scares the death out of me so I over eat at night to make sure it doesn't which usually has me wake up very high .... I want to not eat b4 bed but I can't every time I try I literally get so scared I dot sleep and wind up just laying there shacking until I give up and eat something
1 year ago  ::  Apr 24, 2013 - 8:00PM #4
yeep26
Posts: 2

I can totally relate to your frustration and fear regarding low blood sugar seizures. I used to have them 3-4 times a year and feared going to sleep every night, often eating a lot and waking up with highs to combat what my body could do over night. A few years ago I was visiting my grandparents and had one (my husband wasn't with me or he would have taken care of me like he normally does) anyway, I hit my head on something repeatedly and when I woke up in the morning I had two huge black eyes, my whole face was swollen and I found out (later on) that I had a concussion. <--That was the worst incident I dealt with and while I had a few more since then I've changed my diet drastically and started a fitness regimen that really worked well for me and my sugars have become more level as a result (I haven't had a seizure in over a year). What kind of feedback is your doctor giving you? Suggestions for adjusting your basal rates? Anything? If you ever want to talk about what I've had success with, I'd be happy to tell you more about what I've been doing on here, through email or on FB (search Linsy Wohl). 

I hope more than anything that you find something that works for you so this awful side effect of diabetes doesn't continue to plague your life. Be well!



The picture is the morning I woke up from the seizure. 

 

2 years ago  ::  Oct 06, 2012 - 8:50PM #3
type1skillset
Posts: 6
type1

Dear Marcie,


Having lows is something I can really relate to.  I used to have mine at night and then my wife and kids would have to deal with them.  First off, if you do not have glucose gel as opposed to other options, then get some.  Dex 4 makes a great one that tastes awesome.  Secondly, look for patterns.  Did you have a seizure after correcting?  Did you exercise more.  My feeling is that you may be more scared about not knowing why it happened than the actual event itself.  Don't feel guilty about what has happened, and know that there are answers out there.  For me it would be to talk to your Dr.  I agree with deafmack in that CGMs is good but one should not totally rely on it.  
Hope things improve for you and don't worry, things always seem bad straight after.  In a years time, with a little bit of effort, I am sure you will be back here telling us how things have improved for youSmile 

2 years ago  ::  Jul 19, 2012 - 9:22AM #2
deafmack
Posts: 201

I am sorry about the seizure. I see there was another post about this subject by you. Have you


thought about getting a diabetes alert dog that can alert you to your highs and lows? Is that a possibility?


Also if you have a cgms then set it at a higher number so it alerts you sooner instead of a lower number.


Are you testing besides just depending on the cgms? A cgms is a great tool but one must never rely on it alone.


You still need to test especially before and after meals and anytime your cgms alarms. Just a few thoughts here.


I know how scary seizures arem My Nephew has a life threatening seizures are and I have called 911 several times to have him


life flighted to Children's on life support. Believe me I do get your fear and you have every right to feel the way you do.


At the same time, your children need to know how to call 911 just in case, regardless of the reason for your seizures whether it


be due to a low blood sugar or to low potassium as stated in your other post. And even if you didn't have a medical problem I think


it is good for all parents to teach their children to know how to call 911 and that it is only to be used in an emergency and not for fun. Anygow


I do wish you the best and you can see my answer on your other thread you started.

2 years ago  ::  Jul 14, 2012 - 8:51PM #1
Marcie
Posts: 19
Hi Everyone,

I have been a T1 for 25 years and wear an insulin pump & CGMS. On July 6th I had an unexpected Diabetic seizure and now I am so depressed that I can't think about anything else. I've had a few seizures in the past but this one has completely turned my life around. I just keep thinking what if no one is there to find me and next time my luck might run out! My 8 year old son shouldn't have to babysit me! I'm finding it hard to be alone, go to work, or even sleep. I went to a movie with my family tonight and all I could think about was "the next time it happens". I do everything I can to prevent lows but sometimes errors happen. I looked online for any "emergency alert" that could protect me but all I could find was how other Diabetics have family members & neighbors check up on them. I'm married with two kids and they can only do so much. I feel like someone told me I have a week to live...at least I would see that coming.


Sadly,

Marcie    :o(
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