Script: /go/thread/view/126065/29417635/Note_from_Pastor_Paul
oneSiteTemplate
 
Post Reply
Note from Pastor Paul
2 years ago  ::  Oct 14, 2012 - 6:48AM #7
cmkeyse
Posts: 3,349

Pastor Paul,


Your comment "I sincerely appreciate your feedback, and need to add, that my doctors continue to check my blood flow, and are consistently surprised at how well my blood is flowing, especially with diabetes. BTW - my heart rate has been in the low to mid sixties since 1993, I guess I am doing what it takes in regards to exercising." says in one sentence why diabetics have so many complications, poor blood flow. I am sure you read my comment to Nancy about the stint. The need for the stint has developed for years but was precipitated by by my sister's death from cancer. During the long visits, I didn't do my daily aerobic exercise and while this relative short period of no aerobic exercise should not have been a problem, the build of plaque that occurred before the diagnosis of my diabetes and over the last 16 years enabled the sudden increase in the clog. Since the stint, I have had far less pain of any type including muscle soreness, pain from arthritic knees and ankles, and carpel tunnel syndrome. The pain just slowly increased and I blamed it on old age, not realizing it was a heart malfunction. 


Continued success in you quest to prevent complications.


Chuck


 

2 years ago  ::  Oct 14, 2012 - 12:28AM #6
Pastor Paul
Posts: 227

Oct 7, 2012 -- 7:15AM, cmkeyse wrote:


Pastor Paul,


Painful neuropathy and fibromyalgia are signs of poor blood flow the most serious complication of type-2 diabetes. Your blood pressure numbers are low normal to low and although many doctors love such numbers the facts are that you can feel really bad with such low numbers. The diastolic number 59 is in the low range by 1 and systolic is 11 over low with a heart rate of 65 being only 5 above low. While a heart rate of 60 is super for an athlete, unless you fall into the athletic category it may not be so good.


As the proud owner of a six day old stint, the resulting improvement in blood flow has resulted in unbelievable Improvements in my quality of life. The arthritic pain that I had in my ankles and knees - gone. The recent carpel tunnel syndrome that I had been told needed an operation almost back to 100% feeling. Neuropathy and fibromyalgia both respond to exercise as a very good treatment. My though is that those things that respond to exercise, are general caused by poor blood flow and diabetes causes poor blood flow in most type-2 diabetics.


Just my thoughts. Good luck with your new home. Hope you can get back to your regular exercise soon!


Chuck






 


You make some very interesting observations [based on your own experiences] and I appreciate what you said. As for exercise, I have returned, and while it is a challenge to get back into the routine I had before the move, I am pleasantly surprised to see me not only wroking out, again, but gradually getting back to the 50 minutes a day of sycling, weights, balance and stretching, and Iso-metrics.


I have been actively working out since 1991 [after my decompression surgery of the L-2 through S-1], and before my neuropathy got too painful, I was walking four miles, five days a week, and I had the time down to the 12 minute per mile rate.


My kidneys nearly failed three years back [when my prostrate choked off the bladder and urine backed up into my body]. Since then, the doctors have been watching me closely [happy with my 5.6 A1c test]. According to my Nephrologist, the low blood pressure is caused by my kidneys failing to work at full capacity. I'm currently less than 50%, but that is ten times better than when I entered the hospital three years back.


This body being healthy thing is a daily fight, and you know what I know, and that is that we are continuously struggling to stay above water. I am in constant pain, and at times that pain consumes me, physically and mentally. Just to exercise at a rate of 50 minutes a day, four to five days a week, is a miracle.


We both seem to be heading off the grim reaper for now, so let's rejoice in ur success.


I sincerely apprecaite your feedback, and need to add, that my doctors continue to check my blood flow, and are consistantly surprised at how well my blood is flowing, especially with diabetes. BTW - my heart rate has been in the low to mid sixties fsince 1993, I guess I am doing what it takes in regards to exercising.


Pastor Paul


I'm also posting a recent photo of my furrbaby and service dog [blood sugar specialist] Skittles. She is currently being certified, and she consistantly helps me to identify my sugar lows before they get to the "really" bad stage.

2 years ago  ::  Oct 09, 2012 - 8:54AM #5
cmkeyse
Posts: 3,349

Nancy,


Thanks for your thoughtful remark; however, there was no recovery period in my case because the stint was put in before I had a heart attack. It was inserted just above the wrist and other than limited use of my right hand for a few days, there were no other restrictions. In fact my cardiologist told me it was far safer to be active/exercise after the procedure. After the first week, I feel like I am 20 years younger. It not only relieved the the recent  breathing problem I had during aerobic exercise, it reduced heart rate and BP. The arthritis I had suffered with for years is almost 100% gone and the carpel tunnel syndrome that was recommended for surgery is greatly reduced and will not require surgery anytime soon. I also feel much better and my weight lifting was not as tiring and the recovery is now much quicker. I just feel so much better than I felt in years! Although it is too soon to know, expect to see A1c numbers drop because of increased ability to be active and exercise.


The reason I am sharing my experience is because type-2 diabetics get about 1/3 of the stints inserted in the US although they are less than 10% of the population. Having a stint inserted before you have a heart attack/damage to the heart is is really a life and death issue. So if you are having breathing problems, chest pain, feel tired etc. please see a cardiologist, it could save your life or prevent you from becoming disabled.


Chuck 


   

2 years ago  ::  Oct 07, 2012 - 5:46PM #4
panmat1
Posts: 660

Pastor Paul and Chuck nice to hear from you! Chuck speedy recovery, Pastor Paul good luck with the book. Hope you can post occasionally. Nancy

2 years ago  ::  Oct 07, 2012 - 7:15AM #3
cmkeyse
Posts: 3,349

Pastor Paul,


Painful neuropathy and fibromyalgia are signs of poor blood flow the most serious complication of type-2 diabetes. Your blood pressure numbers are low normal to low and although many doctors love such numbers the facts are that you can feel really bad with such low numbers. The diastolic number 59 is in the low range by 1 and systolic is 11 over low with a heart rate of 65 being only 5 above low. While a heart rate of 60 is super for an athlete, unless you fall into the athletic category it may not be so good.


As the proud owner of a six day old stint, the resulting improvement in blood flow has resulted in unbelievable Improvements in my quality of life. The arthritic pain that I had in my ankles and knees - gone. The recent carpel tunnel syndrome that I had been told needed an operation almost back to 100% feeling. Neuropathy and fibromyalgia both respond to exercise as a very good treatment. My though is that those things that respond to exercise, are general caused by poor blood flow and diabetes causes poor blood flow in most type-2 diabetics.


Just my thoughts. Good luck with your new home. Hope you can get back to your regular exercise soon!


Chuck



2 years ago  ::  Oct 06, 2012 - 9:33PM #2
copperhairpin
Posts: 855
type2

I have missed you Pastor Paul and I hope that maybe you can just drop in once in a while for the heck of it. :-)


I am glad your move is over.  IT really is hard and I am so glad that you have a place that you own so hopefully this will be your last adventure with moving.  I never knew how to price things for sales.  I would have no idea how to do it either. 


Glad to hear that your health is doing well too.  I know how hot it has been this summer and here it is October and it is slow cooling off much here in the Arizona desert. 


Sally

Sally
2 years ago  ::  Oct 06, 2012 - 8:51PM #1
Pastor Paul
Posts: 227

Hey D-life friends and followers....the move is finally complete. After three months, my wife and I finished the long move last week, and we are now settled into our new home. The three months were a challenge, as I had to deal with extreme heat and humidity, several diabilities that slowed me down [like painful neuropathy and fibromyalgia], but after always said and done, we did get finished.


All that's left to do is hold our Moving Sale next weekend, and watch as a group of young men clean out the old house.


My diabetes was pretty well controlled during this time, even though I didn't work out over the last six weeks. Ov course moving, packing, lifting,  etc., it isn't quite like doing nothing. In fact, I lost a few pounds, and at the doctor the other day, my BP was 101/59/65.


I hope to get back to contribute regularly after I finish up my fourth book and submit it to my publisher  early January.


Until then, I'll keep an eye on D-life and drop a note when I  add to the content of the subject matter!



Shalom,

Pastor Paul             

Jump Menu:
    Online :: 0 registered and 2 guests
    No registered users viewing

Welcome

    Welcome to the dLife Community

    Share your story and connect with others

    All About You! In three simple steps create your own mydLife page and share with the diabetes community.

    Connect With Others! Browse member profiles and meet other people with diabetes, just like you!

    Join Groups! Find a group that matches your interests, or create your own group and invite others.

    Share Your Story! Write your own diabetes blog and share your successes, frustrations, and tips on living with diabetes.

"How To" Tutorials

    Calendar