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I do silly things sometimes
2 years ago  ::  Nov 30, 2012 - 4:46PM #6
furball64801
Posts: 6,977

To me its all about balance,   much less of the bad and more of the good.      I  think once in a great while  foods are ok,  thing is when we can not stop at one then we have problems.

2 years ago  ::  Nov 29, 2012 - 6:28PM #5
panmat1
Posts: 660

 Sally, one day at a time. I ate at Thanksgiving too. But today I passed on donut and latter in the day DQblizzard. One day at a time. Nancy

2 years ago  ::  Nov 29, 2012 - 10:30AM #4
mrscora
Posts: 51

Hi Sally. Yes, I have been insulin free for 4 1/2 years now. I chose a transplant center that does steroid avoidance, so I am not on prednisone (too many scary side effects like bone loss and fractures). I take one med (rapamune) once per day (3 or 4 small tables) and the other I take twice a day, 2 tablets each time. I do take a lot of other pills, but they are not related to the transplants, just other issues that have developed over the years. I do still check my glucose, but it's fun because I don't get surprises any more.


Take care.


Cora

T1 since 1966
Kidney transplant 2002
Pancreas transplant 2008
2 years ago  ::  Nov 29, 2012 - 8:50AM #3
copperhairpin
Posts: 861
type2

Thank you Cora.  I have heard of the huge amounts of meds that are anti rejection after a transplant.  Would you share how many and how often?  Does it mean you don't have to take insulin anymore?


I definitely will ask my daughter-in-law not to leave left overs from Christmas.  We were left a huge bowl of mash potatoes that just went to waste.  Wish she would have left more meat. :-)  I really am going to try to figure out some good and tasty vegetables for Christmas.  I love vegetables so it won't be a sacrifice. 


Thank you for the continual support that you give everybody.  I do appreciate your wisdom and experience.


Sally

Sally
2 years ago  ::  Nov 28, 2012 - 2:50PM #2
mrscora
Posts: 51

Sally, don't beat yourself up over the holidays. I'm not saying go whole oink. But there is certainly no harm in the odd treat at this time of year. Just don't do it for days with the leftovers. As for sometimes forgetting shots, it happens to everyone. Even as an almost 50 year veteran of type 1, I used to forget to bolus once in a while. And it was easy with my pump. And now that I have my transplants, my life revolves around my anti rejection meds. And those get missed everyone once in a while. We are all human and do the best we can. Brush yourself off, and just get back on track the next day.



Cora

T1 since 1966
Kidney transplant 2002
Pancreas transplant 2008
2 years ago  ::  Nov 28, 2012 - 10:30AM #1
copperhairpin
Posts: 861
type2
I craved a glass of milk.  I filled a plastic cup with about 4 ounces of milk and drank it last night.  I am lactose intolerant and ended up with cramps and running to the bathroom this morning.  I just craved it so badly.  I should have spent the extra money for vanilla soymilk because I am lactose intolerant.  But I can eat yogurt and cottage cheese.  It is strange.

This just shows my personality of always testing boundaries to see what I can get away with.  It reflects areas of my life that I have to work on.  I often reflect on how my actions affect my diabetes.  It did on Thanksgiving and I worry about Christmas too.  I ate my fill of carbs and I ate a piece of apple pie and two small pieces of sugar free pumpkin pie.  On the holidays is the only time I even attempt to eat pies.
  
I do not cook on holidays.  My daughter-in-law takes great pleasure in doing it.  I need to find some recipes for vegetables this Christmas and would appreciate ideas about it.  Is green bean casserole acceptable?  I know my Hal is craving it very badly.

I am still trying to adjust because I have to use humolog three times a day now.  If I forget once my readings go really up.  My level was 110 yesterday before dinner and I forgot and the reading jumped up to over 220 later.  It has to become part of my routine.  I have no problem in remembering my Lantus before bedtime at all.  I use short needles and it is easy to give the small amount of fast acting insulin but at night using a small needle for a large amount of Lantus is much harder.  I am prone to be careless about rotating my sites and I know there will come a time that I will develop hard spots that will be very hard to penetrate later.

I also am prone to use the same fingertips too much too. I have developed rough callouses on my fingers.  For some reason this does not bother me at all.  I actually am relieved to be able to test and I log on a paper form and it can show me my averages and such at a glance.  I can see the patterns very easily.  I need more test strips and I do wonder how many my doctor can prescribe and Walmart will cover with the authorization.  My readings are not stable.  I will be working on it.  Is there anyone out there that gets more test strips than four a day that is on Medicare?  Does Medicare pay for a lot more?  I use four a day and I need six I think for a while.  I know there is a black market out there for test strips so I understand why Medicare is so skimpy with letting us have them.  But it is a shame that we honest people have to jump through loops to get what we need.  I don't think many seriously diabetics would black market their test strips. *sigh*

But anyways, try to remember that life is good even though we will go through times that are difficult. There is always light at the end of the tunnel and when we overcome challenges we become stronger in character.

Sally           
Sally
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